Morten Hvaal

 

Born in Norway in 1963, Morten Hvaal is an award-winning international documentary photographer, who has covered conflicts and humanitarian crises globally. Clients include: The Associated Press, Time Magazine, Newsweek, USA Today, Der Spiegel, Stern, Paris Match, Economist, BBC, CNN, and most major newspapers. His work in Bosnia can be seen in the prestigious project, 'The Bosnia Book Project 1992-95', featuring 50 photographers who covered the war.  Please read here

 

His "Orphan Voices" exhibition and book (2002) on children orphaned by Aids in Africa was opened by Her Majesty Queen Sonja of Norway, visited by then UN Secretary General Kofi Annan, with the book forward written by Her Royal Highness Princess Martha Louise. Read here.  

 

He is currently represented by Felix Features and holds hands-on photography workshops.  Collaborators include: Nobel Peace Centre (member planning committee), UNICEF, UNESCO, ILO, UNHCR, etc..Exhibitions held in Paris, London, Oslo, Frankfurt, Amsterdam, Gothenburg, Milan, Maputo, Kampala, Cape Town, Bangkok, Copenhagen and New York. Contact: MortenHvaalPhoto@me.com

 

 

 

"Ann" in the room where she lives and works as a prostitute in Chiang Mai,Thailand

on October 3, 2000. She says most of her customers agree to use condoms.

Worldwide, more than 20 million people have died since the first cases of AIDS were identified in 1981.

 

 

Amira Al-Qerem (16) stands by shrapnel marks on the place where her father was killed, in Gaza City on October 27 2010. Amira was missing and presumed dead after she was injured by one of the same explosions that killed her father, brother and sister during the last days of the Israeli invasion of Gaza in 2009. She was found three days later, after her family thought they had buried her remains with those of the other three. She is one of the main subjects of the controversial documentary film "Tears of Gaza" by director Vibeke Løkkeberg.

 

 

A girl plays with an unloaded AK-47 assault rifle in the Afghan capital Kabul on March 11, 1989.

 

 

Members of the Bosnian government Army's female unit, the "Bluebird Brigade" at their bombed-out base near Sarajevo on October 10, 1992. Many of the women in the unit are widows of soldiers who have died in the war.